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  1. Daniel Fights a Hurricane
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  3. In ‘Salvage the Bones,’ Jesmyn Ward Tells Personal Story of Hurricane Katrina
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  5. Daniel Fights a Hurricane: A Novel by Shane Jones, Paperback | Barnes & Noble®

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Daniel Fights a Hurricane

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter. Additional Support Provided By:. Nation Sep 23 U. Education Sep 23 U. Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightenment. Give me something fucked-up and beautiful. February is punishing the townsfolk for flying hot-air balloons. The townies, along with a group of rogue balloonists known as the Solution, go to war with February. While Daniel Fights a Hurricane Daniel shares some spirited similarities with Light Boxes, it is a more fleshed-out novel.

Daniel tells the story of a husband and a wife—Daniel and Karen—and it splits narratively between two different worlds. The tree is growing straight up into the sky. In this part, I can do whatever I want, I have total freedom in creation. The tree is uncontrollable and just insanely growing.

The other part of the book—the one with Karen—is based on reality, and is like vines growing around the tree. The vines and the tree are separate but every once in a while, they cut into each other, and you have this intersection of the parts with Daniel and the parts with Karen. The fantasy pipeline is meant to go to the ocean to provide water for his imaginary town.

Though sequence and consequence exists, his realm of pure imagination runs primarily on free association and self-suggestion. Within his dreamscape a number of misfit characters help to build this pipeline. There is Iamso, a poet man-child, who writes poems to tell Daniel how he feels. There is the Two-Second Dreamer, who sleeps for two seconds and dreams for anyone who needs a new dream.

I am so. Get it? Throughout the novel, Daniel has near misses with Helena, while other characters see her and point him in her direction. If his strongest desire is to live in his fantasy world—a world he finds so beguiling—then he has to remain unfulfilled. We want to remain unfulfilled.

We want to be alive. Along with this cast of friends, what also keeps Daniel unfulfilled is the Hurricane. As I read the previous reviews, I thought it interesting that the critique on Daniel Fights a Hurricane has, somewhat, been based upon what the reviewer feels a novel should be. As I have found with many of the newer, younger writers, is that that might be the wrong approach.

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If you are entering this adventure thinking it should fit in with a preconception, then you will have already missed the boat. That said, maybe Shane Jones is not for everyone.

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Too bad, as I would love to see him become wea As I read the previous reviews, I thought it interesting that the critique on Daniel Fights a Hurricane has, somewhat, been based upon what the reviewer feels a novel should be. Too bad, as I would love to see him become wealthy from his talent. I found Mr.

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Jones' use of perception by the characters very intriguing, especially as the perceptions tightened into the same spaces and realities. The characters were fascinating and were developed in a most original and unique way. And, yes, as a response to another review, I DO enjoy the way the arc of the story is fragmented and pieces itself together in its own time. And, by the way, the only reason I gave Daniel four stars is because I place Light Boxes in the five star category and have to keep a little wiggle room in my ratings.

Aug 01, Michael Seidlinger rated it really liked it. Read the entirety of this hurricane of surreal language in two hr hallucinogenic sessions of reading. What are you reading? I ask because you should be reading this book. Aug 02, Laura added it.

In ‘Salvage the Bones,’ Jesmyn Ward Tells Personal Story of Hurricane Katrina

If you were going to characterize the main character of this slight novel as insane which Shane Jones hopes you won't , then he is probably psychotic rather than anxious. The image of the hurricane in the first pages or half of the book worked well for me though as a metaphor for an anxious mind. The story of Daniel reads like a parable, leaving me as a reader trying constantly to figure out what things were meant to represent, and coming up short again and again.

The narrative shifts bet If you were going to characterize the main character of this slight novel as insane which Shane Jones hopes you won't , then he is probably psychotic rather than anxious. The narrative shifts between the story of Daniel, a pipeline worker with an intense fear of an oncoming Hurricane, as he leaves his job and eventually leaves reality to populate his own world of strange characters and underground pipelines. In the meantime, his ex-wife Karen searches for him, providing, with her narrative, a sort of baseline for the reader who is trying if that reader is me desperately to ground herself.

The book made me feel crazy. I wanted to make sense of it somehow, but the symbols and narratives kept shifting and changing, like a Hurricane -- which is pretty brilliant, but not for me. I've seen it described as surrealist, and would myself categorize it as magical realism which I never really "get". It is also heavily laden with symbolic significance, which I grew tired of by the end. I was much more interested in the real world than the one created by Daniel, and unfortunately, that imaginary world took over more and more as the novelette progressed.

Jones' book wasn't for me, but might appeal to fans of surrealism or magical realism, or fans of his other works which I will probably still try. Jun 11, Lucas rated it really liked it. What's more, nobody has the power to create emotion out of nonsense like Shane Jones does. Perhaps the chapter in the book that most captures Jones' style of writing is the one titled "Box built from green pipes.

The choppy, scattered prose is vaguely reminiscent of "The book of Jonah. In the same way, Jones can say, "they are now living underwater in the pipes," and make it completely believable and compulsive to read. That's just how it is. There are no questions asked.

At first glance, the book may seem to be a story about a man who's mind is stuck in between reality and fantasy, but after cracking open the book the reader will soon discover that the novel is actually a story about Daniel's wife. The bulk of the book is writen in Daniel's perspective: a mix of reality that bleeds into Daniel's nonsensical, make believe world.

Shorter sections, written in Daniel's wife's Karen perspective are interjected into the middle of those parts. These sections anchor the story in reality and give depth and emotion to the the silly and fun bits. The sharp stability of Karen, in contrast to Daniel's imaginary world, reminds the reader of the sadness that Daniel's mind is deteriorating and that "Daniel Fights a Hurricane" is, in reality, a tragedy.

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Jan 04, Oriana rated it did not like it Shelves: why-werent-you-better , book-i-hate-you , read I hate it so much. What a bleak, awful, horrible book. I give up. Okay, yes, I will most likely trudge through the last 20 pages at some point, but I am just so un-compelled. It's so odd , so intentionally bizarre, with these hints and hints that actually no, it's not bizarre but actually devastating and awful. I hate weird for weird's sake, and I hate bottomless despair without cease, and I hate this dumb book.

Flavorpill put it as one of their ten most anticipated books of the year , and now here's this from Word Books: If you're familiar with Jones's first novel, Light Boxes which was briefly optioned by Spike Jonze , that should be reason enough to check out his latest. This book will also appeal to fans of Steven Hall's The Raw Shark Texts , Rivka Galchen's Atmospheric Disturbances , and any other fiction that lives in that hinterland where reality, imagination, hallucination, and coping with loss swirl around like wind, like the ocean.

Dec 12, Joshua rated it really liked it Shelves: quote-literature-unquote. This is the 2nd book from the mind of author Shane Jones and while it may seem confusing at first and at times elliptical, it is also oddly his most linear tale and his most accessible to date. Shane Jones has a wonderful way with words. He can take simple short sentences and fill them with a plethora of meanings.


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Like his previous book Light Boxes I was pulled into each and every world word, stopping to think after each sentence on the numerous possible thoughts of what I had just read. This is t This is the 2nd book from the mind of author Shane Jones and while it may seem confusing at first and at times elliptical, it is also oddly his most linear tale and his most accessible to date.

Daniel Fights a Hurricane: A Novel by Shane Jones, Paperback | Barnes & Noble®

This is the story of a man named Daniel and his fight with a Hurricane that may or may not be coming. This is the story of mental illness and how it can strip the sanity from our loved ones. This is the story of coming to grips with ones own delusion and still letting it wash over you. Ultimately this is the story of belief, pain, hope, despair and the power of love and how those emotions can bind us together to fight the coming storm. I can't say this is for everyone, but if you can get through the first few pages wanting more, then this book will leave you satisfied in the best possible haunting sort of way.